Clinically a high-functioning sociopath? A case study on BBC’s Sherlock Holmes

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Character Overview:

Sherlock Holmes is a fictional private detective created by Arthur Conan Doyle, and this character is played by Benedict Cumberbatch in the BBC television series Sherlock (Gatiss & Moffat, 2011). As a consulting detective widely reputable for solving crimes, Sherlock is portrayed as smart, attentive to detail, intuitively clever, and consequentially often condescending and arrogant. That said, albeit a great reputation for intelligence and problem-solving, Sherlock tends to be emotionally cold, distant, insensitive, and tremendously unempathetic when it comes to interpersonal relationships or social interactions. In fact, throughout Sherlock, various characters comment that he is “a bloody psychopath”, an “insensitive prat” and “without a heart” (Gatiss & Moffat, 2011-2014). However, given the buzz about Sherlock’s notorious reputation of being “a high functioning sociopath”, does this character really meet diagnostic criteria for such a statement? This case study will closely analyze whether Sherlock clinically meets the criteria for an antisocial personality disorder as compared to an autism spectrum disorder, followed by a detailed analysis of Sherlock’s interpersonal tendencies through an attachment theory lens. Implications for relevance to modern mental health diagnosis and practice will be discussed.  Continue reading →

Mental Health in Literature: 8 Reading Recommendations

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Literature allows both authors and their readers to explore mental health culture in a variety of different ways. This post highlights a few favorites from my reading list this summer, some which have had a profound impact on my passion for therapy. Additionally, most of these would be great books for anyone to read, not just for those specializing in mental health, so if you’re looking for something, I hope these recommendations help out! These selections are from a range of genres, varying from young adult fiction, educational nonfiction, textbook excerpts, autobiographies, to Broadway musical screenplays. (As a side note, I’m currently looking for more books to read, so if you have anything you think I’d like, please message me).  Continue reading →