How can pop culture teach social justice to the next generation?

Pop1

Overview: 

Many Americans today are familiar with widespread blockbusters such as The Avengers, Superman, the Harry Potter movies, and other widely recognized Hollywood films. Being a few examples of mainstream icons, the concept of popular culture can be defined as modern culture transmitted via mass media and often aimed particularly at young people (Zehr, 2014). Given its prevalence, pop culture is a channel of social justice education that has great potential to educate our current generation. Especially because children, adolescents and emerging adults are heavily exposed to these varieties of popular entertainment, pop culture can inadvertently shape and inform an individual’s core and peripheral beliefs about their society (Linker, 2014). Because it is so prominent in an increasingly millennial world, these forms of media can also be used in the classroom as a teaching tool to help young people better relate to concepts about social justice, diversity, and inclusion. The following article is an adaptation of a final paper I wrote for a social work course this past semester.  Continue reading →

Mental Health in Literature: 8 Reading Recommendations

book.jpg

Literature allows both authors and their readers to explore mental health culture in a variety of different ways. This post highlights a few favorites from my reading list this summer, some which have had a profound impact on my passion for therapy. Additionally, most of these would be great books for anyone to read, not just for those specializing in mental health, so if you’re looking for something, I hope these recommendations help out! These selections are from a range of genres, varying from young adult fiction, educational nonfiction, textbook excerpts, autobiographies, to Broadway musical screenplays. (As a side note, I’m currently looking for more books to read, so if you have anything you think I’d like, please message me).  Continue reading →

The Wise Build Bridges: How Marvel’s Black Panther Connects to Social Work

bp1.jpg

Overview:

A common misconception about social work is that it simply entails social justice advocacy, because this field encompasses multiple areas of social service, centering around the core value of helping those in need. Ranging from psychotherapy, foster care, minority advocacy, child welfare, mental health counseling, and more, social workers can be found in hospitals, mental health clinics, schools, nonprofit agencies, and government offices, serving a wide range of responsibilities (National Association of Social Workers). Main figures in Marvel’s recent film Black Panther, such as the undercover spy Nakia and the goodhearted king T’Challa, demonstrate core motivations not unlike social workers everywhere (Black Panther, 2018). This featured post will therefore explore careers that follow a social work degree, connect Black Panther to social service ideologies, and feature several interviewed graduate students.  Continue reading →