Mental Health in Literature: 8 Reading Recommendations

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Literature allows both authors and their readers to explore mental health culture in a variety of different ways. This post highlights a few favorites from my reading list this summer, some which have had a profound impact on my passion for therapy. Additionally, most of these would be great books for anyone to read, not just for those specializing in mental health, so if you’re looking for something, I hope these recommendations help out! These selections are from a range of genres, varying from young adult fiction, educational nonfiction, textbook excerpts, autobiographies, to Broadway musical screenplays. (As a side note, I’m currently looking for more books to read, so if you have anything you think I’d like, please message me).  Continue reading →

The Wise Build Bridges: How Marvel’s Black Panther Connects to Social Work

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Overview:

A common misconception about social work is that it simply entails social justice advocacy, because this field encompasses multiple areas of social service, centering around the core value of helping those in need. Ranging from psychotherapy, foster care, minority advocacy, child welfare, mental health counseling, and more, social workers can be found in hospitals, mental health clinics, schools, nonprofit agencies, and government offices, serving a wide range of responsibilities (National Association of Social Workers). Main figures in Marvel’s recent film Black Panther, such as the undercover spy Nakia and the goodhearted king T’Challa, demonstrate core motivations not unlike social workers everywhere (Black Panther, 2018). This featured post will therefore explore careers that follow a social work degree, connect Black Panther to social service ideologies, and feature several interviewed graduate students.  Continue reading →

What can Gollum from The Lord of the Rings teach us about Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID)?

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Character Overview:

Most commonly recognized as Gollum, Smeagol is a Hobbit who becomes corrupted by the One Ring, and slowly loses his self-identity while an ulterior, nefarious second personality develops. Though he is widely known as the creepy character bloodthirstily whispering the words “my precious”, Smeagol’s original character was a relatively ordinary Hobbit living in The Shire with his family. Gollum’s persona is particularly interesting throughout the Lord of the Rings trilogy, since initially this character does not even seem to be human, but rather a repulsive creature. This case study will explore Smeagol’s slow recovering of his past, his split personality between two opposing identities, and how his behaviors can relate to the prevalence of psychosis today. Continue reading →

What can Marvel’s Loki teach us about Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD)?

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Character Overview:

Loki is the God of Mischief, adopted brother of Thor, and grows up as a prince of Asgard despite actually being a Frost Giant. As presumable through the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Loki is a troubled character who has had a difficult childhood, a lack of self identity, and a divorce from his birth culture. He is also a widely popular antagonist because of the underlying sense of goodness in him, despite his consistent tendencies of betraying those who trust him and being characteristically spontaneous. This case study will look into the psychological background behind Loki’s behaviors, and explore how his actions and tendencies affect maintaining healthy relationships and living a typical lifestyle.  Continue reading →