Progress and process in mental healthcare: A discourse on Jaime Lannister from Game of Thrones

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Warning:

As a disclaimer, this post covers detailed content up to the season 8 finale of Game of Thrones. Please do not read further if you want to avoid spoilers. As another disclaimer, this post discusses material exclusively from the Game of Thrones HBO TV series, and it does not draw from any content from George R. R. Martin’s books. I also want to mention that this post explores substance use disorders and themes of addiction, and I would like to include a trigger warning because of these sensitive topics. Additionally, even if you do not watch or read Game of Thrones, this case study is a broad overview about the character of Jaime Lannister, followed by a generalized discussion on mental health practice as a whole.

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Captain America: A Case Study in Veteran Mental Health

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Character Overview: 

Analyzing superhero Captain America, who wakes up 70 years past his time after crash-landing on a war mission, Steve Rogers’ mental health struggles to rediscover his place in society can arguably relate in numerous ways to military veterans across the country today, and their potential experiences returning from service.

Steve Rogers is the Marvel Cinematic Universe’s heroic protagonist from Brooklyn during World War II. In Captain America: The First Avenger (2011), Steve attempts to enlist in the U.S. military multiple times, consistently rejected because of his health problems and frail physique. These attempts catch the attention of an American organization, the Strategic Scientific Reserve (SSR), who work to bring down the Nazi science division named HYDRA. Because of Steve’s morality and inner strength, he is selected for a top-secret Super Soldier program developed by Dr. Abraham Erskine and Howard Stark (The First Avenger, 2011). After gaining superhuman strength through the transformation, Steve becomes a war mascot, an American icon, and a key member in the fight against HYDRA. Known nationally as Captain America, Steve frees captured Allied POW’s and actively fights HYDRA in a variety of attacks (The First Avenger, 2011). Steve ultimately crashes into the Arctic during his final mission with the SSR in 1945, becoming frozen in ice and preserved for 70 years. He subsequently awakens as not only a surviving war veteran, but also as a soldier very much out of his time. This case study will analyze Steve’s recovery process throughout The Avengers (2012) and The Winter Soldier (2014), and speculate on the importance of recognizing similar struggles in military veterans today.  Continue reading →

Everything, Everything: Challenges in Providing Mental Health Care

Lately, I’ve been encountering some of the most emotionally challenging sessions at work. Everything that I learned about interpersonal relationships, everything about psychology–I’ve found that everything, everything, matters in shaping the therapist that I want to become. I was challenged beyond my own mental capabilities this week, and realized that I still have a long way to go before I can confidently provide the best mental health care possible. Until then, I still have everything to learn. This post is a reflection on thoughts from my current job, and the mental preparation I need while building a career in therapy.  Continue reading →